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Is Your Employee Telling the Truth?

Managing a work environment is no simple task for HR employees. It’s a good assumption that most seasoned HR professionals and managers have heard every complaint, dispute, personal problem, sickness, theft and quite possibly more from employees.

While these are all sensitive issues in a work environment, how can you tell if an employee is in fact not telling the truth to reap inner-office sympathy, a day or two off work, or some of a company’s policy benefits? Short of being a mind reader, there are ways to detect that an employee is lying. An article published at www.experityhealth.com, reveled some unique indicators that just may end up revealing the whole truth and nothing but the truth.  

  • Reading Body Language

This is an interesting one. When a “suspected” employee is questioned about a certain situation, they may exhibit certain defensive or protective body language. This could include covering their mouth with their hands, avoiding eye contact, excessive fidgeting, or “shifting their body away from the questioner.”

  • Understanding Timelines

Resorting to a timeline of events is an effective method. While it all depends on the situation, many issues or concerns may include some sort of timeline. Guilty employees can get confused and lured into the truth if they explain times and dates out of order, are evasive about key details, or just have “a blank look” when asked about certain moments.

  • Change of Voice

Lying can be stressful even among the best of them. The fact that stress can cause the vocal cords to constrict, a lying employee’s voice may crack, have a higher or lower pitch, or they may start clearing their throat. 

Although, HR professionals are not expected to have the training of an interrogator for the FBI, they don’t need to. Yet, it’s important not to be naive and clearly understanding some of these signs. In the end, by setting an example and implementing the consequences will only provide for a more secure and honest work environment. 

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Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Human Resources Morale Tips for Small Businesses

How to Deal with an Employee Who has a Negative Attitude

Employees with a negative attitude are never productive for any company. Not only are they difficult to work with, but their negative outlook can spread throughout the staff, affect moral and disrupt progress or success of a business. Also, over time, an employee’s negative behavior could mean the difference between gaining and losing a client or valuable employees. 

To ensure a harmonious work environment, HR managers should first recognize who the employee(s) are that have a negative attitude. An article on NaturalHR.com, explains that this may be more difficult than it seems but some sure signs include:

  • They always question management and constantly disapprove of decisions. 
  • Protesting against work volume, co-workers or the company.
  • Creating rivals between employees and management. 
  • Overstating mistakes by either the company or other employees.

If you recognize some of these characteristics, arrange a meeting with the employee. Before speaking to them, however, clearly recognize how their attitude is effecting the work environment. Are employees upset or discouraged? Are employees leaving for other opportunities? Is success or progress in the company being affected? Whatever the concerns, organize your thoughts and notes, and speak clearly about the issue(s) at hand and try the follow practices as suggested by Natural HR: 

  • Keep it professional. Don’t make it seem like it’s a personal attack. 
  • Be clear and relay examples of their bad/negative attitude and that it needs to change for the better. By being vague or evasive won’t necessarily address or solve the problem. 
  • Always listen to what the employee has and let them voice their concerns. There may be a root cause. 
  • Try not to point the finger directly at them. Rather than using “you have a bad attitude ” try explaining “we are seeing some negativity around the office because of your bad attitude.
  • While it’s important to be clear that their behavior has to change, try to conclude the meeting on a positive note, and how they can make a difference in the workplace. 

It’s never easy confronting an employee with issues that can have an effect on other staff and even a company. By following some of these steps, it can alleviate some problems and provide the chance for a more pleasant work space.  
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Are Your Employees Constantly Leaving? Enhance Your Retention Practices

Retention is always a hot topic among HR managers these days. As professionals are afforded many opportunities of where they want to work or establish a career, having top talent on your staff is one thing, keeping them part of your staff is certainly another.

Sapling, a provider of on-boarding and HR software, recently reported a series of best retention practices for HR professionals. While some points are common HR knowledge, others will be a great addition to your arsenal of retention tools.

Create New Hire Retention

Ever have a new employee leave shortly after they were hired? There are a few reasons why and “employees who experienced a poor on-boarding experience” is one of them.  Sapling states that creating an efficient on-boarding process right from when they are hired is essential to ensuring a new employee stays for a longer term. In fact, companies that have a proven on-boarding process improved their new hire retention by 82 percent.

 

Update Compensation Plans Regularly

It’s in anyone’s nature “to follow the money and benefits.” Sapling reported that a competitive compensation package is the most attractive factor when candidates are considering a new job. So, if your company isn’t adjusting or “sweetening the compensation plan” regularly, you could more than likely lose out on the talent you want.

 

Establish Career Paths and Development

It’s common for employees to “move on” for career advancement. So, it’s important to explain and demonstrate to employees that they may have an opportunity for growth in your company. As a HR professional, map out a career path and help them get there through employee development opportunities. This not only helps your company surpass a skills gap, but allows candidates to move into key leadership roles when they become available.

 

Reexamine Benefits and “Perks”

It was also revealed that employees “would switch to a job that allows them flextime, while 37 percent would switch to a job that allows them to work off-site at least part of the time.” In other words, (and it may vary from company to company) most people would appreciate a better work-life balance.

There’s enough competition just to find and hire a qualified employee with the ideal skill set. Retaining can them can almost be as difficult. This means reestablishing your best retention practices, and enhancing the employee experience in your organization.

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Three Basic HR Best Practises You Should Never Ignore

Human Resources may not be the easiest department to work for in a company. During any given week, HR professionals are often known to break the good news with the bad; hiring a key candidate or turning one down; organizing certain roles during restructuring;  all the while hiring, recruiting and retaining top talent.

Contrary to popular belief among employees (and even HR professionals), the bad doesn’t always outweigh the good, and best practices are constantly being established to ensure this.

In an article on recruiter.com, one best practice to always resort to is creating an employee feedback system. Feedback is an effective means of learning more about suggested changes. Perhaps start conducting what recruiter.com calls employee satisfaction services, or create feedback channels to stay current on certain issues within a company and employee’s concerns.

In the same article, it explained that HR professionals should implement special incentives or performance-based bonuses among employees. While a common practice, it always feels good to be rewarded for hard work and when accolades come down from upper management, it not only maintains good morale, but productivity as well.

The topic of recruiting practices can be discussed until eternity, and is a hot topic all its own. To offset some of the challenges of recruiting, creating and maintaining talent pools is essential for any HR pro.

Talent pools are basically a database of potential candidates to resort to in the time of hiring. According to Monster.com, talent pools are “a contingency plan and can result in reducing costs or time and productivity is not affected too much by a skills shortage. According to Monster.com, some effective ways of building a talent pool include:

  • Remember Previous Potential Applicants: Even though a previous candidate didn’t receive that final offer, it doesn’t mean their skills and qualifications are at a loss for future roles. File their resume (and any additional documents) and add them to “your pool” for reference down the road.
  • Network, Network, and Network:  Trade shows, industry conferences, association meetings, to name a few, are all effective ways of meeting and interacting with potential candidates for future hires. Ask for business cards, request a CV, or basic contact information (and adding separate notes) for your data base is a great way to increase references for the future.
  • Online Searches: This day and age networking is not limited to industry functions. Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace and several social networking sites make it so simple to reach out to a potential candidate. This is also something to do when the time allows and always keep their details in a data base.

 

Most of all, Monster.com recommends to keep your talent pool small. It should only contain professionals who will make a difference to your company. Also, the more effort you take to create a solid talent pool, the less work will be required when it comes to the hiring process.

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Four Great Ways Managers Can Relieve Stress for Employees

Your staff stressed at work? They’re not the only ones.

According to Wrike’s United States stress statistics from 2019, 94 percent of American workers reported experiencing stress at their workplace. This means just a mere six percent that were surveyed are content and stress-free. What’s more, as reported by The American Institute of Stress, businesses in the United States lose upwards of $300 billion annually as a result of workplace stress.

Based on these stats, it’s safe to say that stress is more the rule in the workplace than ever before. Having a healthy and happy staff is one of the keys to success. Even though stress may be part of this success, there are ways managers or HR managers can create a less stressful environment.

Data from a national survey of more than 1,000 office employees conducted by Bridge by Instructure, reported that “employers may not be providing the right tools or atmosphere to help employees achieve the work-life balance for full productivity and engagement.”

As a result, Bridge by Instructure recognized the following ways for employees to alleviate stress and a practice that HR managers should encourage among staff.

Here are four key points to consider.

Be More Proactive with Managers

Have your employees communicate more with managers or executives about their needs and career goals. In turn, this can help reduce stress and enable them to achieve greater job satisfaction. It can also help you – as a manager – fulfill more responsibilities.

Take Breaks from the Desk

Sitting for hours can takes its toll more than we realize. So, tell employees to take quick breaks, stand up, grab a coffee, or perhaps exercise with walks or aerobics during lunch. Combined, these actions throughout the work day can reduce stress.

Disconnect

In an age where email and wireless communications reign supreme and 24/7 work cycles are common, employees should take time each day to shut of their phone and other smart device(s) and close their laptop. As a result, this will not only reduce stress, but increase productivity during work hours.

 Take Time Off When Needed

Even though there may never be a good time to take time off or call in sick when needed, encourage your staff to use Paid Time Off (PTO) and use designated sick days when they feel under the weather. Believe it or not, getting away or absences from work increase productivity and improved engagement when they return.

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Are Office Politics Dominating Your Work Environment? Here’s How to Manage Them.

According to collinsdictionary.com, office politics are defined as the ways that power is shared in an organization or workplace, and the ways that it is affected by the personal relationships between the people who work there.”

Office politics is common in any company. Nonetheless, they can ruin productivity, reduce morale, and cause much wasted time, effort, and even good talent. Competition for advancement, striving for constant attention (and the boss’s ear) and the need to always get “your own way,” are not all, but some of the root causes.

Let’s be honest. Office politics can get down, right nasty.

A national survey of more than 1,000 office employees conducted by Bridge by Instructure, Inc., a talent management software suite for businesses, reported “over half believed engaging in workplace politics is an important factor in receiving a promotion.”

While this may be true in some cases, it also means other employees with talent could be disregarded for their efforts and not given the rewards they deserve.

So, what can hiring managers or managers do about this? A lot.

Find the Source

Office politics can arise where competition is fierce. As a result, it’s important to determine who the employee (or sometimes employees) is that is causing the politics in the first place.

It’s not hard to spot. As a manager, try to recognize those superiors who play favorites or those employees who thrive on gossip beyond the water cooler chit chat. In fact, www.mindtools.com suggests to see who gets along with who; which employee(s) find it more difficult to interact with others; determine in-groups, out-groups or cliques; or if interoffice connections are based on respect, friendships, or even romances.

In the event the workplace does get heated (as it often can with office politics) it’ll be easier to determine the source, and find a temporary solution for the problem. Unfortunately, office politics never really go away.

Strive for Open Communication

Communication in the workplace is essential for productivity, growth, and success. It’s also reduces the chances of politics, according to The Management Study Guide. They recommend employees should not play with words and always pass on the information in its desired form. Plus communicate via texts, emails, or various work management software to avoid confusion is also a good idea. From a manager’s perspective, request to be cc’d or bcc’d on any communication to avoid any miscommunication or problems down the road.

 

Promote Transparency and Team Work

A productive workplace is often a happy workplace. As a manager, encourage transparency at all levels so employees are clear of company goals. Policies should also be same for everyone. The Management Study Guide suggests team work should be promoted to not only strengthen bonds amongst employees, but develop stronger relationships.

While there are many methods for managers to combat politics, it just takes a few basic management skills. Once the politics are reduced, you can feel good about managing a sound, creative and productive work environment.

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How to Avoid a Confrontation during a Performance Review

Performance reviews. People love ‘em or hate ‘em. Regardless, they do have a place in any corporation to ensure development and growth, recognition, and even retention. However, not all performance reviews are positive experiences for managers and employees.

For instance, outside of job performance and growth, an employee may have some complaints about other staff members, the overall work environment or other concerns. So, managers should listen carefully, consider how to phrase their comments, be constructive, and provide suggestions on how the issue(s) can be resolved.

According to Hays Specialist Recruitment, there are certain steps managers can take to turn a potential confrontation into easy discussion with ample resolve.

Take “Issues” Head On 

Employees are often provided the chance to raise concerns about problems with other employees, complaints of being treated unfairly, or issues with heavy workloads, etc. If this happens, no matter how big or small the issue, Hays suggests that managers should be astute, take the issue head-on, and try to avoid the employee from dwelling too much on the problem at hand.

Find the Source of the Problem(s)

If some of the employee’s comments are surprising, it’s always best to ask them for some examples. It’s also important to read between the lines, and try to get to the source of the issue. Better yet, ask the employee to try and resolve the issue themselves before providing answers to their problems.

 

Resolve the Issue(s)

One key aspect to remember is it’s not always necessary to decide if the employee is right or wrong. Perhaps try to reach a solution that the employee is happy with. According to the University of Berkley Human Resources, “looking first for needs, rather than solutions, is a powerful tool for generating a win/win option.” This couldn’t further from the truth. Once you understand the advantages of their solutions, you better know their needs and how to meet them.

 

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Why Employers Should Consider Hiring College Grads

There’s always a certain risk when hiring any employee, regardless of his or her experience. Sure, there might be a greater chance to take with a less-experienced, college grad over a more experienced candidate. Yet, while it all depends on the role, there are substantial benefits in considering those who are fresh out of school and they shouldn’t be entirely disregarded during the hiring process.

The number of college grads looking for their first career job is vast. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, hundreds of thousands graduates graduate every year, ready to take on a new, challenging role in their field of study.

So, should they be considered for a job in your company? Certainly. Here are some reasons why.

Motivation and Dedication

As thousands of grads look for a job in their field every year, achieving an entry-level role can be competitive. According to LinkedIn, this can be a strong motivator to learn, be motivated and develop a deep commitment to a company. An added benefit is that managers can train new grads more easily to company policy and best practices, without dealing with prior work habits they developed from a previous employer.

Grads Have More Experience Than You Think

Even though a college grad may have little professional experience and training may be inevitable, it’s important to realize they have something to offer many companies. This includes being current with the latest software systems, best practices, and even industry trends, regardless of the field. While this may not be equivalent to say, 10 years of experience, a company can save costs, time and effort in training. College grads can even be a great source of new information and bring insightful, fresh ideas to the table.
Develop Talent for the Long-Term

According to LinkedIn, a college grad’s commitment to performance, development and advancement has many benefits for a company. This is good news for college grads as companies recognize these characteristics as valuable qualities. Also, by allowing those to learn and grow into their role could potentially mean future advancement and success – not only for the grad but for a company as well.

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How to Offset Some Challenges of Remote Employees

In an age of remote technology and cloud companies, it only seems natural that companies are hiring more remote contractors or employees.  While the thought of working from home may be a dream-job for many employees, with additional benefits for companies and employers, it’s still a relatively new concept that can present some challenges for managers and employers.

From securing a successful hire to ensuring productivity is always consistent, here are few key solutions to make the telecommuting concept work for your company.

1. Look for Experience and “Avoid a Gamble” When Hiring

Trust just might be one of the most important elements to recognize when hiring a remote employee. For instance, during the interview, positive answers to questions like “have you worked remotely before” or “how effective are your time management skills in a remote setting” may not be sufficient enough.

So, by taking a closer look at a candidate’s past roles, experience, and achievements can all help determine their work habits and how effective they can be out of the office. It’s even more positive if they accomplished certain goals in a remote setting. All of these aspects can result in an understanding that they’ll be responsible, won’t take advantage of their independence, and will be productive.

2. The Employer Must Clearly Understand the Job Role

This may sound like a no brainer, but knowing exactly what it takes to complete an assignment is vital to ensure productivity from a remote employee. It can also provide the employer with a clearer understanding of their skillset. For example, if a project is taking too long to complete or assignments are constantly late, they may not be qualified for the position; are not managing their time properly; or they are taking advantage of their independence.

3.       Create Meetings for Idea Sharing
According to workopils.com, employers should arrange random group chats about ongoing projects or company objectives to encourage idea sharing and creativity, which is essentially in lieu of those random chats in an office setting. Many companies use Skype, one of the many group chat apps, or even the age-old teleconferences to hold these sessions. As a result, it’s not only productive, but it further helps meet deadlines and company goals.

According to an article in recuiterbox.com, it’s often best to avoid an employee who wants the position based on the sole fact that it’s a remote position (even though they may have the qualifications).  It’s always best to determine why the candidate initially applied for the role, what interests them about the opportunity, and what ideas they can bring to the table to achieve your company’s goal.

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How Managers Can Reduce Stress in the Workplace

Managing stress among staff is not an easy task for employers. Tight deadlines, adhering to strict budgets or difficulties between co-workers are just a few of the origins of stress in the workplace. Yet, just as there is no one cause, there’s no one solution either.

According to a report, Reducing Stress by the University of Washington with data sourced from The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), there are a series of methods employers can utilize to reduce stress for its employees and create a happier work environment.  Here are three of their key finds:

  1. Revise or Create Workplace Policies and Best Practices

The report states that heavy workloads that aren’t achievable can create all sorts of stress.  So, by properly assessing an employee’s workload, managing their workflow, and ensuring their responsibilities are reasonable given their skill set are just a few methods that can alleviate stress. In fact, the report suggests employers or managers to:

  • Provide the chance for an employee (when possible) to have more control over their work pace.
  • Engage leadership to employees, as well as middle managers and supervisors.
  • Ensure employees use vacation time to “disconnect” from their work environment.
  • Create a zero-tolerance policy for harassment.
  • Arrange training for employees and managers regarding resolution issues after a conflict arises.
  1. Create Support…and more Support

Taking on the blunt a project, picking up the slack of poor performers, or just having too much work or responsibility is a common cause of stress. To alleviate it, the report suggests introducing workplace wellness programs such as walking groups or physical activity challenges as they “have concurrent benefits of increasing physical activity, social interaction, and team-building.” As a result, these activities can all help an employee realize that co-workers or managers do care. In turn, when they see the added support, they are more productive. Additionally, stress can be reduced when an employee is recognized for achievements with verbal comments, monetary rewards, or even written acknowledgements.

  1. Increase Communication

If all else fails, communication is always best. According to the report, getting employees involved in open discussions of work-related stresses can be very effective as it can result in achieving a better understanding of the employee’s concerns and causes of stress.

Recognizing and reducing stress in the workplace is an essential task for any employer, director, or manager/supervisor. It not only helps create a more harmonious work environment, but can increases productivity to effectively move forward and meet company goals.

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