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Best Places to Work Communication Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Job Interviews National Trends Social Media Software Tips for Small Businesses Working from Home

Are Work-From-Home Positions The Future?

While Americans still wait to return to normalcy while practicing social distancing, many companies are reevaluating traditional onsite culture and propose a permanent shift to remote work.

For example, major employers such as Nationwide, Mondelez and Barclays are discussing reducing physical office space in favor of more remote work. Many companies are seeing the advantage of decreasing physical real estate space, which would save considerable overhead on expenses. 

More companies are seeing proof that employee productivity doesn’t suffer in a remote environment. Companies may not need their full staff to physically return to offices to accomplish their workloads. If the US is facing a global economic slump post-COVID, remote work can help many companies significantly cut costs to survive the difficult times that may lie ahead.

Nationwide Insurance announced a permanent transition to a hybrid-style work model. They will continue to operate their four corporate offices in Ohio, Des Moines, Scottsdale and San Antonio. The majority of their other locations around the US will have their employees continue working from home.

While this outcome could be detrimental for the commercial real estate industry, we could also see more expensive renovations to comply with social distancing. Property management firms are already anticipating having open layouts and new seating arrangements, which will be costly for renovation teams.


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How to Take a Kinder Approach to Firing Employees

As an HR professional, if you’ve ever had to fire someone, you know this is one of the hardest parts of the job. However, every good business leader knows that sometimes the best decision for a company is to dismiss an employee. In fact, according to a Harris poll, nearly 40 percent of Americans have lost their job before. 

Employees report that being treated with respect is something they need and want from their employer. In fact, employees say that appreciation and recognition, as well as the opportunity for development, learning and growth, are less important than their need for respect. 

Even if an employee isn’t working out, it’s essential to treat them with respect. Here are some tips for terminating an employee with integrity and compassion.

Opportunities for Improvement

Companies should have two different types of employee termination: attitude-based and performance-based. If an employee is failing to meet clear job criteria, management and HR must set employees up for success. Employees need to be aware of any performance issues, and management needs to help set expectations for a solution. 

Employees need a clear timeline to improve performance – between 30 to 90 days – and management should regularly check-in to gauge their performance. Break down goals into more manageable milestones. However, if an employee has shown no improvement by the end of the probationary period, it’s acceptable to have a hard termination conversation. 

If an employee has a poor attitude, this can quickly evolve into a toxic workplace for other employees. One bad employee that has a negative attitude can soon corrupt and poison an entire team. Management can still be respectful and say, “Is there something going on? When you act this way, your attitude impacts our entire company and your coworkers.” 

Consider Alternatives

If someone is unhappy, see if they would be happier somewhere else in the company. Sometimes an employee is burned out and would prefer a new career. If an employee has a strong skill set, this might be an excellent option. 

No matter what happens, HR and managers must document everything to ensure they are complying with termination laws. You may also have to prove later that employees weren’t working out, and other steps were taken before terminating their employment. Teach management to take detailed notes about problem employees, listing specific attitude or performance issues in writing. Remember to document all behavior and performance issues, as these are needed to help minimize potential legal risks.

Ensure Termination is Handled Correctly 

Before management fires an employee, make sure they consult with HR. A termination plan must be in place to help ensure that the company is following all procedures and legal requirements when terminating an employee. 

Be Transparent

If a company exhausts all their options, and they need to let an employee go, it’s best to be detailed and precise. Explain when they will receive their final paycheck, severance pay, returning company property and how benefits will be terminated. Stand firm and don’t give them the impression you may change your mind. Transparency is a critical component when it comes to terminating an employee.


Ninja Gig is an online job application software for employers and recruiters that makes it easy to post legally compliant job applications. Whether you need to post seasonal employment applications or full-time jobs, Ninja Gig’s advanced applicant tracking system software makes it easy for HR departments to track applicants. Sign up today for a free trial and try Ninja Gig’s automated hiring software.

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Culture Pivot: Building a Remote Workforce

In today’s modern world, it’s becoming more and more common for companies to have remote workforces. Post-pandemic, more companies than ever will restructure their current operations model to allow employees to work from home. If your company is considering having a telecommuting workforce, consider these helpful suggestions.

Hiring Good Talent

Hiring talented employees helps make companies successful. Build a team that is passionate about their dreams, goals and jobs, and motivated by more than just their paychecks. Hardworking and ambitious virtual employees that maintain positive mindsets are essential to having a remote workforce.

Set Clear Expectations

Before hiring remote employees, set clear expectations about the delivery of work, available hours for scheduling and job-specific expectations. If you’re transparent upfront, you’ll be able to identify the correct applicants for the job quickly. 

Key Performance Indicators

Instituting key performance indicators (KPI) can help companies monitor and analyze the progress of their remote workforce. KPIs should align with companies’ quarterly and yearly goals, which helps easily track progress over time. Management should monitor their own KPIs, holding themselves to the same standards as their employees.

Focus on Communication

To replace a traditional workplace with a remote workforce, companies need to have effective communication. If all employees are onsite, it’s easy to walk to someone’s desk to get an answer, but having the proper digital tools in place to facilitate communication can significantly help. Software applications, such as Zoom and Slack, are great for remote employees. They can easily schedule appointments, share files, send instant messages, discuss tasks and even participate in video conferences.

Organized Task Hub

Employees need to be set up for success, not failure. Keeping track of tasks can be tedious and challenging, and things can be easily overlooked. It’s essential to create a central, organized hub that highlights all tasks, information and due dates. Popular project-management software platforms include Basecamp, Asana, Trello and Monday

Getting Started

While the idea of hiring a remote workforce and implementing these changes may seem overwhelming, more and more companies are beginning to make this switch. As more companies embrace a remote culture, look to successful organizations as guidance for how their remote business models work. Additionally, more employees view working remotely as an excellent job perk, helping them avoid sitting in traffic for hours each day. Productive employees are far more valuable than those that are overworked and overstressed.

Ninja Gig offers a highly effective applicant tracking system that allows you to accept job applications online. Our advanced system features an automated hiring process for online recruitment. You can quickly create legally compliant job applications to help you attract top candidates for your remote workforce. Sign up today, try our free trial and see how easy our automated hiring software is to use!

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Uncovering the Root Cause of Workplace Stress

According to the American Institute of Stress, job stress is the primary source of stress for American adults, and it is progressively getting worse over the last several decades.

Long-term, increased stress can lead to all types of health conditions, including hypertension, heart attack, anxiety and sleep disorders. 

Americans are working longer and harder than ever before. A government report found that the number of hours worked increased by eight-percent in one generation by the late 1990s, which means that Americans went from working an average of 40 hours to 47 hours a week. Globally, Americans are different from other countries. While in 1995, workers in Japan worked more than Americans, now Americans put in an extra month more of work than the Japanese and an astounding three months more than those working in Germany. 

The Health Effects of Stress

Occupational stress can cause a variety of physical ailments, including:

  • 30 percent suffer from back pain
  • 28 percent complain of stress
  • 20 percent report feeling tired 
  • 13 percent suffer from headaches

Job Stress is Costly

According to the American Institute of Stress, job stress costs U.S. businesses more than $300 billion annually, which is primarily due to:

  • Absenteeism
  • Accidents
  • Employee turnover
  • Medical, legal and insurance-related costs
  • Poor productivity
  • Workers’ compensation claims

Common Causes of Workplace Stress

There are many reasons that workplace stress exists and occur on the job, such as:

  • Lack of clarity; unclear objectives
  • Insufficient employee support
  • Poor cohesion amongst teams and employees
  • Employees have little control over their work or experience micromanaging
  • Difficult or inflexible work hours
  • Psychological harassment
  • Poor management and lack of communication policies
  • Poor health and safety policies

Human resources departments should work to help companies minimize stressful environments, which can significantly boost employee satisfaction and retention rates.


Ninja Gig offers an automated hiring process for online recruitment. We feature legally compliant job applications via our online job application software, which makes it easy for HR departments to accept job applications online and track qualified applicants. Sign up for a free Ninja Gig trial today and simplify your recruitment process.

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Four Workplace Trends That Positively Change Performance

Workplace performance can be influenced by external factors and even society’s changing ideologies. Gallup’s State of the American Workforce report shows that when employees are positively engaged at work, their profitability increased by 21 percent; however, only 51 percent of employees report being actually engaged at work. The following workplace tech trends will help positively change employees’ work environments, thus increasing their overall performance and profitability.

Prioritizing Workplace Safety

The #metoo movement has helped to address the issues of workplace safety and harassment. Employees that witness harassment are more likely to begin searching for new employment. How well a company responds to misconduct, including harassment and discrimination, is essential, which is why employers need to facilitate more open lines of communication.

Collaboration

Open employment engagement is important, especially as more jobs focus on computer work and being behind a desk. Whether it’s using Google Docs or Slack, incorporating collaborative techniques can help boost employee productivity dramatically. 

Work-Life Balance

Studies show that three out of four employees have a difficult time balancing their family work and other personal obligations. Furthermore, more employers are offering flexible working schedules and arrangements to help employees better balance and manage their time. Employees that can have more flexible work arrangements are more satisfied with their overall work culture. 

Technology to Support Inclusion and Diversity

By building a work environment that embraces inclusion and diversity, you can help encourage employees to produce new, innovative ideas. Different experiences and backgrounds unique shape us, which helps create a multi-talented team.


Ninja Gig helps to automate HR systems, including focusing on an applicant tracking system for online recruitment. Making it easy to accept job applications online, Ninja Gig also makes it easy for applicants to apply quickly. Sign up today for a free Ninja Gig trial and see how it can help improve and automate your business’s hiring practices.

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Three Best Practices HR Managers Should Implement into a Family Business

Working for a family business can have its shares of challenges. While it may be successful and maintain a solid reputation on the outside, it may not have the traditional structure, policies, or work environment as other corporations on the inside. 

Changing the ways of a corporation since “the father or grandfather” founded the business more than 40 years ago will not happen overnight, but it’s not entirely impossible – especially if it will benefit the company in the long term and resonates successfully to the “corporate family members or board.” Here are three key best practices to suggest if you land a HR management role at a family-run business.

  • Set a Professional Foundation.

According to jobstreet.com, certain family members – such as a son, daughter, or sister – may feel entitled to a more senior position within the company or some owners may expect that family members work twice as hard as regular employees. Both situations can potentially be unfavorable and have a negative impact on exit plans, so you need to ensure there’s a structured platform of professionalism. You should also try to prevent unprofessional behavior, tardiness or even favoritism, which can all be common. The result could be a positive one without any distinction between family members and non-family members, which can result in more objective and sound decision making. 

  • Implement Training Sessions

Jobstreet.com also suggests that you implement succession planning, talent management plus regular training among employees to not only grow but to ensure the company successfully moves forward. After all, it’s not uncommon for many family members to “grow up” within the family business and also have long-term, loyal employees. While they may be knowledgeable of operations, the industry and company structure, it’s vital for any company to change with trends and always implement best business practices.

  • Increase Retention Practices 

Walking into a family business may sometimes seem like stepping back in time. Its company policies may be redundant and expectations from employees may be old school. For instance, according to Boston Consulting Group (BCG), it’s not uncommon for company leaders of a family business to expect employees to work as hard and as long as they did earlier in their careers. So, it’s important to make them to realize that employees’ expectations have changed. Millennials even Generation Xers now seek a better work-life balance, comfortable work environments, career development, plus rewards and recognition for their work. Implementing benefits, holiday hours, vacation time, and bonus structures, to name a few incentives, will not only increase moral, but attract better talent and increase overall retention. 

There are countless of family businesses that are successful. While some have different policies and structures than other corporations, these are just a few of the best practices that HR managers should implement or strengthen to ensure company growth and a strong future. By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

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Is Your Employee Telling the Truth?

Managing a work environment is no simple task for HR employees. It’s a good assumption that most seasoned HR professionals and managers have heard every complaint, dispute, personal problem, sickness, theft and quite possibly more from employees.

While these are all sensitive issues in a work environment, how can you tell if an employee is in fact not telling the truth to reap inner-office sympathy, a day or two off work, or some of a company’s policy benefits? Short of being a mind reader, there are ways to detect that an employee is lying. An article published at www.experityhealth.com, reveled some unique indicators that just may end up revealing the whole truth and nothing but the truth.  

  • Reading Body Language

This is an interesting one. When a “suspected” employee is questioned about a certain situation, they may exhibit certain defensive or protective body language. This could include covering their mouth with their hands, avoiding eye contact, excessive fidgeting, or “shifting their body away from the questioner.”

  • Understanding Timelines

Resorting to a timeline of events is an effective method. While it all depends on the situation, many issues or concerns may include some sort of timeline. Guilty employees can get confused and lured into the truth if they explain times and dates out of order, are evasive about key details, or just have “a blank look” when asked about certain moments.

  • Change of Voice

Lying can be stressful even among the best of them. The fact that stress can cause the vocal cords to constrict, a lying employee’s voice may crack, have a higher or lower pitch, or they may start clearing their throat. 

Although, HR professionals are not expected to have the training of an interrogator for the FBI, they don’t need to. Yet, it’s important not to be naive and clearly understanding some of these signs. In the end, by setting an example and implementing the consequences will only provide for a more secure and honest work environment. 

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

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Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Human Resources Morale Tips for Small Businesses

How to Deal with an Employee Who has a Negative Attitude

Employees with a negative attitude are never productive for any company. Not only are they difficult to work with, but their negative outlook can spread throughout the staff, affect moral and disrupt progress or success of a business. Also, over time, an employee’s negative behavior could mean the difference between gaining and losing a client or valuable employees. 

To ensure a harmonious work environment, HR managers should first recognize who the employee(s) are that have a negative attitude. An article on NaturalHR.com, explains that this may be more difficult than it seems but some sure signs include:

  • They always question management and constantly disapprove of decisions. 
  • Protesting against work volume, co-workers or the company.
  • Creating rivals between employees and management. 
  • Overstating mistakes by either the company or other employees.

If you recognize some of these characteristics, arrange a meeting with the employee. Before speaking to them, however, clearly recognize how their attitude is effecting the work environment. Are employees upset or discouraged? Are employees leaving for other opportunities? Is success or progress in the company being affected? Whatever the concerns, organize your thoughts and notes, and speak clearly about the issue(s) at hand and try the follow practices as suggested by Natural HR: 

  • Keep it professional. Don’t make it seem like it’s a personal attack. 
  • Be clear and relay examples of their bad/negative attitude and that it needs to change for the better. By being vague or evasive won’t necessarily address or solve the problem. 
  • Always listen to what the employee has and let them voice their concerns. There may be a root cause. 
  • Try not to point the finger directly at them. Rather than using “you have a bad attitude ” try explaining “we are seeing some negativity around the office because of your bad attitude.
  • While it’s important to be clear that their behavior has to change, try to conclude the meeting on a positive note, and how they can make a difference in the workplace. 

It’s never easy confronting an employee with issues that can have an effect on other staff and even a company. By following some of these steps, it can alleviate some problems and provide the chance for a more pleasant work space.  
By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

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Is an Employee Underperforming? Here’s What You Can Do

Having a one-on-one with an employee who is not meeting their expectations in their role can be a challenge among HR professionals and managers. Whether it addressed during a performance review or a separate meeting, it should hopefully serve as a productive means of improving their focus, skills and overall competence.

Being properly prepared with the specific details of their performance and expectations are essential to a productive meeting. The topic of conversation may not be the most optimistic at first, but by clearly understanding where an employee could improve and following certain guidelines, you can turn a negative situation hopefully into a positive one.  

  • Talk to the Them ASAP

It’s not difficult for any seasoned manager to recognize an employee is struggling in their role. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) suggests its best to arrange a meeting with the employee much sooner than later. In some cases, an employee may be aware of their underperformance, and are possibly expecting such a meeting to take place. So, by delaying the meeting, they could possibly use that to their advantage and allege an unlawful action through a lawyer. In the event the discussion needs be delayed, document the planned meeting and include what is involved, and why it had to be postponed. 

  • Hear Them Out 

No one likes to hear bad news about their work performance. Nonetheless, they may have good reason for not meeting their responsibilities, and perhaps a sound solution can be made moving forward. So, be sure to hear them out or find the source of the problem.

  • Document Everything 

While it’s important to document why the meeting was postponed, it’s ten times as important to document everything that was discussed. In the event that the employee is terminated and a wrongful dismissal lawsuit results, you’ll have the meeting on company record. From using formal guidelines, stating company policies, and explaining expectations, to outlining consequences and getting a signature are just some of the aspects to document.

  • Be Clear on The Company’s Expectations

The SHRM also recommends that the employee is made aware of their expectations, clarify what the problems are, set specific objectives (that may involve some further training) and then arrange a date to discuss progress. On a final note, the meeting should conclude on a positive note, which may provide some added diligence to their role and overall performance. 

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

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Three Basic HR Best Practises You Should Never Ignore

Human Resources may not be the easiest department to work for in a company. During any given week, HR professionals are often known to break the good news with the bad; hiring a key candidate or turning one down; organizing certain roles during restructuring;  all the while hiring, recruiting and retaining top talent.

Contrary to popular belief among employees (and even HR professionals), the bad doesn’t always outweigh the good, and best practices are constantly being established to ensure this.

In an article on recruiter.com, one best practice to always resort to is creating an employee feedback system. Feedback is an effective means of learning more about suggested changes. Perhaps start conducting what recruiter.com calls employee satisfaction services, or create feedback channels to stay current on certain issues within a company and employee’s concerns.

In the same article, it explained that HR professionals should implement special incentives or performance-based bonuses among employees. While a common practice, it always feels good to be rewarded for hard work and when accolades come down from upper management, it not only maintains good morale, but productivity as well.

The topic of recruiting practices can be discussed until eternity, and is a hot topic all its own. To offset some of the challenges of recruiting, creating and maintaining talent pools is essential for any HR pro.

Talent pools are basically a database of potential candidates to resort to in the time of hiring. According to Monster.com, talent pools are “a contingency plan and can result in reducing costs or time and productivity is not affected too much by a skills shortage. According to Monster.com, some effective ways of building a talent pool include:

  • Remember Previous Potential Applicants: Even though a previous candidate didn’t receive that final offer, it doesn’t mean their skills and qualifications are at a loss for future roles. File their resume (and any additional documents) and add them to “your pool” for reference down the road.
  • Network, Network, and Network:  Trade shows, industry conferences, association meetings, to name a few, are all effective ways of meeting and interacting with potential candidates for future hires. Ask for business cards, request a CV, or basic contact information (and adding separate notes) for your data base is a great way to increase references for the future.
  • Online Searches: This day and age networking is not limited to industry functions. Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace and several social networking sites make it so simple to reach out to a potential candidate. This is also something to do when the time allows and always keep their details in a data base.

 

Most of all, Monster.com recommends to keep your talent pool small. It should only contain professionals who will make a difference to your company. Also, the more effort you take to create a solid talent pool, the less work will be required when it comes to the hiring process.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.