Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Coworkers Employee Retention Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Morale National Trends Resumes Salary Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Are Your Employees Constantly Leaving? Enhance Your Retention Practices

Retention is always a hot topic among HR managers these days. As professionals are afforded many opportunities of where they want to work or establish a career, having top talent on your staff is one thing, keeping them part of your staff is certainly another.

Sapling, a provider of on-boarding and HR software, recently reported a series of best retention practices for HR professionals. While some points are common HR knowledge, others will be a great addition to your arsenal of retention tools.

Create New Hire Retention

Ever have a new employee leave shortly after they were hired? There are a few reasons why and “employees who experienced a poor on-boarding experience” is one of them.  Sapling states that creating an efficient on-boarding process right from when they are hired is essential to ensuring a new employee stays for a longer term. In fact, companies that have a proven on-boarding process improved their new hire retention by 82 percent.

 

Update Compensation Plans Regularly

It’s in anyone’s nature “to follow the money and benefits.” Sapling reported that a competitive compensation package is the most attractive factor when candidates are considering a new job. So, if your company isn’t adjusting or “sweetening the compensation plan” regularly, you could more than likely lose out on the talent you want.

 

Establish Career Paths and Development

It’s common for employees to “move on” for career advancement. So, it’s important to explain and demonstrate to employees that they may have an opportunity for growth in your company. As a HR professional, map out a career path and help them get there through employee development opportunities. This not only helps your company surpass a skills gap, but allows candidates to move into key leadership roles when they become available.

 

Reexamine Benefits and “Perks”

It was also revealed that employees “would switch to a job that allows them flextime, while 37 percent would switch to a job that allows them to work off-site at least part of the time.” In other words, (and it may vary from company to company) most people would appreciate a better work-life balance.

There’s enough competition just to find and hire a qualified employee with the ideal skill set. Retaining can them can almost be as difficult. This means reestablishing your best retention practices, and enhancing the employee experience in your organization.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Human Resources National Trends Nepotism Social Media Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Are Office Politics Dominating Your Work Environment? Here’s How to Manage Them.

According to collinsdictionary.com, office politics are defined as the ways that power is shared in an organization or workplace, and the ways that it is affected by the personal relationships between the people who work there.”

Office politics is common in any company. Nonetheless, they can ruin productivity, reduce morale, and cause much wasted time, effort, and even good talent. Competition for advancement, striving for constant attention (and the boss’s ear) and the need to always get “your own way,” are not all, but some of the root causes.

Let’s be honest. Office politics can get down, right nasty.

A national survey of more than 1,000 office employees conducted by Bridge by Instructure, Inc., a talent management software suite for businesses, reported “over half believed engaging in workplace politics is an important factor in receiving a promotion.”

While this may be true in some cases, it also means other employees with talent could be disregarded for their efforts and not given the rewards they deserve.

So, what can hiring managers or managers do about this? A lot.

Find the Source

Office politics can arise where competition is fierce. As a result, it’s important to determine who the employee (or sometimes employees) is that is causing the politics in the first place.

It’s not hard to spot. As a manager, try to recognize those superiors who play favorites or those employees who thrive on gossip beyond the water cooler chit chat. In fact, www.mindtools.com suggests to see who gets along with who; which employee(s) find it more difficult to interact with others; determine in-groups, out-groups or cliques; or if interoffice connections are based on respect, friendships, or even romances.

In the event the workplace does get heated (as it often can with office politics) it’ll be easier to determine the source, and find a temporary solution for the problem. Unfortunately, office politics never really go away.

Strive for Open Communication

Communication in the workplace is essential for productivity, growth, and success. It’s also reduces the chances of politics, according to The Management Study Guide. They recommend employees should not play with words and always pass on the information in its desired form. Plus communicate via texts, emails, or various work management software to avoid confusion is also a good idea. From a manager’s perspective, request to be cc’d or bcc’d on any communication to avoid any miscommunication or problems down the road.

 

Promote Transparency and Team Work

A productive workplace is often a happy workplace. As a manager, encourage transparency at all levels so employees are clear of company goals. Policies should also be same for everyone. The Management Study Guide suggests team work should be promoted to not only strengthen bonds amongst employees, but develop stronger relationships.

While there are many methods for managers to combat politics, it just takes a few basic management skills. Once the politics are reduced, you can feel good about managing a sound, creative and productive work environment.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Firing Employees Goals Human Resources Job Interviews Morale National Trends Online Employment Applications Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

How to Avoid a Confrontation during a Performance Review

Performance reviews. People love ‘em or hate ‘em. Regardless, they do have a place in any corporation to ensure development and growth, recognition, and even retention. However, not all performance reviews are positive experiences for managers and employees.

For instance, outside of job performance and growth, an employee may have some complaints about other staff members, the overall work environment or other concerns. So, managers should listen carefully, consider how to phrase their comments, be constructive, and provide suggestions on how the issue(s) can be resolved.

According to Hays Specialist Recruitment, there are certain steps managers can take to turn a potential confrontation into easy discussion with ample resolve.

Take “Issues” Head On 

Employees are often provided the chance to raise concerns about problems with other employees, complaints of being treated unfairly, or issues with heavy workloads, etc. If this happens, no matter how big or small the issue, Hays suggests that managers should be astute, take the issue head-on, and try to avoid the employee from dwelling too much on the problem at hand.

Find the Source of the Problem(s)

If some of the employee’s comments are surprising, it’s always best to ask them for some examples. It’s also important to read between the lines, and try to get to the source of the issue. Better yet, ask the employee to try and resolve the issue themselves before providing answers to their problems.

 

Resolve the Issue(s)

One key aspect to remember is it’s not always necessary to decide if the employee is right or wrong. Perhaps try to reach a solution that the employee is happy with. According to the University of Berkley Human Resources, “looking first for needs, rather than solutions, is a powerful tool for generating a win/win option.” This couldn’t further from the truth. Once you understand the advantages of their solutions, you better know their needs and how to meet them.

 

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Business Books Communication Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Job Interviews Morale National Trends Online Employment Applications Resumes Social Media Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Rejecting a Candidate for a Role? Here’s How to do it the Right Way.

Although a relatively short process, rejecting a candidate from a role after a short while after interview takes some professionalism, courtesy, and diligence. A bad rejection method can result in a negative reputation about your company, its culture, and can even damage your company brand.

Remember, a candidate is part of your industry and word of mouth spreads quickly, especially if they didn’t take the rejection well. Plus, it’s always important to maintain a relationship with a skilled candidate for a future hire. Just because they were turned down for one role, doesn’t mean you can’t contact them in the future for a more suitable one.

So, when the time comes to reject a candidate be courteous, diplomatic, and responsive.

According to theundercoverrecruiter.com, when the call comes from a client or an executive naming their choice for a role, let the candidate (s) know as soon as possible. After all, it can be stressful process with hopes of a new role on the horizon. Informing them that they didn’t get the role means they can simply move on to other endeavors.  Also, in some cases, it’s more appropriate and professional to take a few minutes do it over the phone, especially if it was a long multi-interview process.  Be respectful, talk to them, and break the news in a gracious way.

Even though hiring managers receive dozens of resumes for one position, they should be as courteous as possible to all applicants before moving to the next round of interviews. This means reaching out those who were not selected. A common practice is a rejection email template. These not only save time, but it also lets the applicant know that they were not selected for the position.

In fact, according to a survey conducted by Indeed, “44 percent of candidates said they waited up to two weeks for a response, while 15 percent waited months. Additionally, “55 percent revealed the digital hiring process has made the experience more inefficient and their resume seems to disappear.”

Choosing your words carefully and being kind and considerate is always essential to ensure the applicant will still have a positive perception of your company. Indeed suggests some of the following tips to create an effective, yet positive rejection email template:

  • Be Polite
    First off, always being polite. Saying “thank-you for their interest in your company, the time they spent completing an application, and the efforts made for the interview (if applicable) is always important.  While courteous, it also demonstrates that you value an applicant’s time.

 

  • Make it More Personal
    It’s true that a rejection email template can be a little cold or too general. So, Indeed suggests including the applicant’s name, the title of position they applied, a note relating to a previous conversation, and mention a specific positive attributes (s) to their skills.

 

  • Suggest Applying for Another Role in the Company
    In the event a candidate was turned down for the desired role, yet they would have been a good fit for the company with their skills, let them know in a simple sentence. There are many reasons why an applicant doesn’t get hired. So, you may want to encourage them to apply for other opportunities in the future and keep their resume and contact information in your data base.

Rejecting an applicant doesn’t have to be a difficult or pessimistic experience. Regardless of the method you do choose, being courteous, diligent and professional is the best way to avoid any hardship or resentment towards you and your company.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Communication Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Job Interviews National Trends Nepotism Online Employment Applications Social Media Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Five Unique Questions that are Illegal to Ask in an Interview

There’s a long list of labor laws that hiring managers need abide by and the last thing you want to do is ask one that leads to discrimination. While recounting every labor regulation in the law book is hard for even the most ardent attorney, hiring managers and HR professionals need to be extra diligent when it comes asking certain specific questions during an interview.

According to Monster, there are a series of ones to avoid, which are considered discriminating (and vary from state to state). Asking about age, religion beliefs, nationality, or kids (or planning on having kids) are all well-known questions to avoid. Yet, there are a series of questions and topics that are lesser known. Here are just a few that are most likely illegal in every state:

  1. Bankruptcy Filing

Asking if a candidate has ever filed for bankruptcy is big a no-no, along with asking about loans, wage attachments, and overall financial status. However, you can ask for certain financial information related to benefits of compensation after they have been hired.

  1. Military Discharge Status

While it’s fine to ask if an applicant is a veteran or they have any job-related experience from the military, always avoid asking their discharge status.

  1. Asking About Nearest Relatives or Next of Kin

This is another question that is off limits, yet it’s legal to ask an applicant about a nearest relative or next of kin for emergency contacts once after they have been hired.

  1. History of Belonging to a Union

Raising a question about previous roles and affiliation within a union is another one to avoid. However, you can make reference about the union status of your workplace.

  1. Disabilities

Whether a disability is apparent or not, this is very much illegal  under The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which “provides protections for disabled employees and job applicants.” When a candidate’s disability is obvious (or has disclosed their disability), it’s suggested to ask about any necessary (or reasonable) accommodations they may need for the position.

Interviewing can be a long process and it’s wise to make special note of the more unique questions. Even though you may not realize that some questions are in fact illegal, it’s always best to do further research to avoid any type of discrimination.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Communication Dealing with Bosses Dress for Success Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Job Interviews National Trends Online Employment Applications Resumes Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Three Red Flags to Look for when Interviewing an Applicant

Realizing an employee is not an ideal fit for your company or doesn’t perform up to certain standards – after they have been hired – is frustrating for any hiring manager. After all, the interview process can be long, often challenging, and provides added cost for your company.

Short of predicting the future with a crystal ball, the process of screening resumes and interviewing is crucial. While hiring managers or HR professionals can learn only so much from a candidate from resume and series of interviews, there are certain indicators to realize well before the interview is over.

Character goes a long way for a candidate, and even further for hiring managers. For instance, before the screening and interview process begins, thebalanacecareers.com suggests some key examples to follow to ensure not all is lost after a hire.

Make Sure Candidates are Familiar with Your Company

Enthusiasm is important in the eyes of hiring managers. So, the more a candidate understands a company’s service or product, the more it says about their preparedness, research skills and how enthusiastic they are for the position. In the event a candidate doesn’t demonstrate all that much knowledge, it simply reflects a lack of enthusiasm, and in turn, little interest in the goals a company wants to achieve.

Request Proof of Experience

This may seem like a no brainer, but according to the balanacecareers.com “nothing is more telling than candidate who can’t provide a detailed answer” of a previous role or accomplishments. A portfolio of work, documented success, specific procedures and responsibilities of a role should all presented and credible. So, it’s recommended to watch for vagueness, evasiveness, or not providing a credible answer at all.

They Don’t Take Responsibility for Past Actions or Mistakes

Not every candidate is perfect. Hiring managers know this. A sure fire red flag, according to thebalanacecareers.com, is when a candidate repeatedly blames coworkers and managers, limited resources, or team members for past mistakes (if requested by the hiring manager).

It can demonstrate how poorly they are at accepting responsibility or can’t effectively solve their own problems. In the event a candidate was fired in a past role, listen to their reasons. If they are blameless, couldn’t admit to errors, or seems they are evading the truth, it may be wise to simply pass on the candidate altogether.  It’s always best to ask for the truth. The right candidate will clearly admit to errors and explained how they resolved them.

 

It’s never easy to find an ideal employee. By following some simple guidelines and using common sense, screening and interviewing an employee will become easier, more efficient and time well spent.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

 

Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Goals Human Resources Morale National Trends Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

How Managers Can Reduce Stress in the Workplace

Managing stress among staff is not an easy task for employers. Tight deadlines, adhering to strict budgets or difficulties between co-workers are just a few of the origins of stress in the workplace. Yet, just as there is no one cause, there’s no one solution either.

According to a report, Reducing Stress by the University of Washington with data sourced from The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), there are a series of methods employers can utilize to reduce stress for its employees and create a happier work environment.  Here are three of their key finds:

  1. Revise or Create Workplace Policies and Best Practices

The report states that heavy workloads that aren’t achievable can create all sorts of stress.  So, by properly assessing an employee’s workload, managing their workflow, and ensuring their responsibilities are reasonable given their skill set are just a few methods that can alleviate stress. In fact, the report suggests employers or managers to:

  • Provide the chance for an employee (when possible) to have more control over their work pace.
  • Engage leadership to employees, as well as middle managers and supervisors.
  • Ensure employees use vacation time to “disconnect” from their work environment.
  • Create a zero-tolerance policy for harassment.
  • Arrange training for employees and managers regarding resolution issues after a conflict arises.
  1. Create Support…and more Support

Taking on the blunt a project, picking up the slack of poor performers, or just having too much work or responsibility is a common cause of stress. To alleviate it, the report suggests introducing workplace wellness programs such as walking groups or physical activity challenges as they “have concurrent benefits of increasing physical activity, social interaction, and team-building.” As a result, these activities can all help an employee realize that co-workers or managers do care. In turn, when they see the added support, they are more productive. Additionally, stress can be reduced when an employee is recognized for achievements with verbal comments, monetary rewards, or even written acknowledgements.

  1. Increase Communication

If all else fails, communication is always best. According to the report, getting employees involved in open discussions of work-related stresses can be very effective as it can result in achieving a better understanding of the employee’s concerns and causes of stress.

Recognizing and reducing stress in the workplace is an essential task for any employer, director, or manager/supervisor. It not only helps create a more harmonious work environment, but can increases productivity to effectively move forward and meet company goals.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Firing Employees Human Resources Morale Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Consider These Steps when Terminating an Employee

Terminating an employee is never easy. It is a difficult situation for both the employee and the employer. There’s some criteria to consider when terminating an employee. Yet, despite the grounds, legalities, etc., there are certain criteria to consider that can make the process less strenuous for both parties.

1. Get to the Point

Terminating an employee is always disheartening. It’s best to arrange a meeting with the employee as quickly as possible and inform them right away. Employees easily detect bad news and it’s best to be clear and direct as possible. In fact, according to an article in the Harvard Business Review, by announcing the termination immediately, the employer will get the individual’s attention about what’s coming next. Additionally, it’s suggested to inform the employee directly, then state the reasons(s) clearly so they understand it’s a firm decision that has been determined prior to the meeting.

2. Listen to the Employee

As it’s not difficult to predict the reaction of an employee getting terminated, The Harvard Business Review also suggests that by taking time, seeing their reaction, and listening to what they have to say makes it much easier to clarify the reasons of their dismissal. Plus, rushing through the meeting may seem insensitive, callous and may create unnecessary irritated emotions.

3. Be Organized to Avoid Future Repercussions

Always have the proper documents completed, including a written notice of termination (or similar documents) and details on severance (if applicable). Geneviève Desmarais, the Assistant Vice-President of Legal Affairs for The Business Development Bank of Canada suggests that when an employee disputes their termination, it’s due to the lack of back-up documentation to support it. It then “becomes a question of ‘he said, she said’ and the burden lies on the employer to demonstrate the termination was made for a just and sufficient cause, and was properly conducted.”

Some employees may be surprised by being let go, while others may have predicted their termination by realizing their lack of performance or behavior. Regardless, showing courtesy, respect and overall professionalism can help make the process less strenuous and smoother for both the employee and employer.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Business Books Communication Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Firing Employees Goals Human Resources Morale National Trends Nepotism Salary Social Media Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

Bullying in the Workplace and What Employers Can Do About It

Bullying was at one time just an issue in school yards and classrooms. Yet, in recent years, bullying in the workplace has become a major concern among employees, managers and/or supervisors. While having a tough, demanding boss is one thing, bullying is something different altogether. It can essentially undermine an employees’ performance, greatly affect their overall attitude and cause unnecessary stress.

According to The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, bullying in the workplace is not illegal in the U.S. unless it involves various forms of illegal harassment. The result of bullying is extensive and can even be the potential source of physical and mental health problems. So, what can employers do about bullying and how can they prevent it in their workplace?

Here are a few actions employers can take to fight against this age-old behavior in efforts to prevent it:

1. Identify Bullying

Unlike the school yard tormentor, bullying in the workplace goes way beyond stealing lunch money. The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries also states that bullying involves many behavioral patterns towards an employee(s) including (but not limited to):

  • Being shouted and sworn at or humiliated.
  • Deliberately excluded or isolated
  • Excessive mentoring and micro-management
  • Deliberately singling out an employee for no apparent reason

 2. Educate Managers, Supervisors and Directors

Employers or human resource professionals may want to implement a zero-tolerance anti-bullying program (or policy) to ensure senior staff is aware of bullying and that they are provided with proper training on how to get involved constructively. In fact, The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries states that bullying will less likely take place if a company takes a strong stand and the tormentor is likely to be accountable for their actions.

 3. Reporting and Investigating Bullying

Employers can also encourage staff to report any incidents. Although no employee wants to be known as a “snitch or a tattle-tale,” reporting about bullying should be handled quietly and confidentially with assurance that there won’t be any further consequences in the workplace.

On a final note, according to the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, if an employer, supervisor or manager doesn’t take action against bullying in the workplace, then they are accepting a share of the responsibility for future abuses.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.

Categories
Best Places to Work Communication Dealing with Bosses Employee Retention Goals Hiring Tips Human Resources Morale National Trends Software Tips for Small Businesses Workplace Discrimination

How to Keep Top Talent Happy at Your Work Place

High turn-around among employees is challenging for any business. It’s time consuming, cost intensive and can be potentially unproductive when it comes to meeting company goals. It can also hinder a company’s reputation and the ability to keep or even attract top talent.

There are any number reasons for a having a high turnaround of employees. Yet, when it becomes apparent that the front door to your business is more like “a revolving door,” perhaps take a closer look at your work environment to find the cause.

Outside of salary increases and great benefit programs, which are strong incentives to any employee, no business environment is perfect. There’s always politics, that “one employee who creates a headache for everyone” and of course, the common stress-factor. However, establishing and maintaining a harmonious work environment may offset these challenges. In turn, it may provide a more productive, enjoyable experience for your employees, and the ability to hire and keep favorable ones.

Here are three aspects to make your work environment more enticing:

1. Minimize Stress:  Distribute Work Evenly and “Recognize Weak Links”

There’s a long list of things that can cause stress in the work place and too much work is at the top of that list. Having the luxury of a large department to handle major projects is not always feasible for many businesses. Yet, by dividing responsibilities fairly among a team will alleviate some stress, especially when it comes to meeting deadlines. Plus, realizing all your employee’s strengths and weaknesses during a project and placing them in more appropriate roles can further reduce stress, plus provide a more relaxing atmosphere for “the performers.”

2. Address Employee-to-Employee Issues Immediately

There are several reasons for less-than-desirable relations between co-workers and can be a good reason for any good employee(s) to resign. This is an issue that always needs to be addressed and it’s pertinent to realize that a problem exists, determine the root cause and then find a resolution immediately for both parties. In the end, it may create a more positive atmosphere for everyone involved without the issue escalating into larger problems.

 3. Recognize Achievement Where it’s Due

There’s an old saying that “good work is always rewarded with more work.” This can become a burden for any top performer. It can make them feel they are being taken advantage of or not being properly recognized for achievements and as result, become disgruntled. While many large companies offer attractive bonus structures or other monetary incentives to recognize achievements, sometimes a heartfelt thank-you or other means of recognition is all takes to make an employee feel appreciated. In fact, according to The Young Entrepreneur Council, recognition programs, implement peer-to-peer recognition, or even arranging a small celebration off-site is all that is needed to boost morale. Although some employers just don’t have it in their hearts to acknowledge good, solid work, these are all positive incentives to consider. The results may be surprising.

By signing up with Ninja Gig, companies easily promote openings using online employment applications. Online job applications make it easy for qualified applicants to apply. Sign up now for your free trial and get your online job applications in front of potential candidates now.