How to Find the Best Place to Work (for you)!

There are many businesses that tout that they have the best work environment, best benefits, best vacation policy and on and on.

So how do you determine the best place for you?

This may sound old fashioned, but get out a piece of paper, a pen and make a list.  Number your page 1-5 and then list the number one thing that is important to you in a company and go from there.

Once you have your priorities, you have direction on what to look for.  You probably already know what industry you want to work for and that information is also key in finding the right company.

There are a plethora of lists online detailing the top places to work, top places to work for balance and family, employee reviews, reviews of salaries and benefits and basically lists for any piece of information you are looking for.

A recent report at glassdoor.com detailed the top 50 companies to work for and you can also sort it by city to find a job near you.  http://www.glassdoor.com/Best-Places-to-Work-LST_KQ0,19.htm

Lists like these are invaluable for the job seeker because you can get firsthand accounts of what it’s really like to work for a particular company.

If you’re looking for a job with a company that won’t be listed on nationwide lists, then go by word of mouth.  One facebook user recently asked on a post if anyone knew anything about working for a local school district.  What it was like to work there?  What the pay was like?  Benefits?  She was surprised when she received a truckload of feedback from her facebook friends.

Because of the feedback, she was able to determine a course for her future and also received offers from people to “put a good word in” for her if she indeed decided to apply for a job at the school district.

Going straight to the source to find out information is definitely not frowned upon.  If you don’t know anyone that works at a particular place of business, ask around.  Find a friend of a friend that works there and ask them about the benefits, the time off, the work environment and what it’s “really” like to work there.

It’s okay to be picky about where you work.  You want to be happy there and the employer wants longevity from their employees.

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